20 Hussalonia songs + 1 Personalized Thank You Song + 1 Extra Download for a Friend = $9. (Offer, and life as we know it, ends August 1st.)

20 Hussalonia songs + 1 Personalized Thank You Song + 1 Extra Download for a Friend = $9. (Offer, and life as we know it, ends August 1st.)

Buy Hussalonia’s new “best of” record Pop Does Not Mean Popular on Bandcamp before August 1st and we will send you a personalized “thank you” song (with your name sung) plus an additional download code that you can pass along to a friend. 
http://hussalonia.bandcamp.com/album/pop-does-not-mean-popular-a-polite-introduction-to-hussalonia-2004-2014

Buy Hussalonia’s new “best of” record Pop Does Not Mean Popular on Bandcamp before August 1st and we will send you a personalized “thank you” song (with your name sung) plus an additional download code that you can pass along to a friend. 

http://hussalonia.bandcamp.com/album/pop-does-not-mean-popular-a-polite-introduction-to-hussalonia-2004-2014

Our special offer just got more special! Buy “Pop Does Not Mean Popular” before August 1st and, in addition to your personalized thank you song, we’ll send you a one-time code for a free download in hopes that you’ll pass it along to a friend. That’s 20 tracks, a thank you song with your name sung, and a free download for a friend, all for only $9. Offer ends soon!

http://hussalonia.bandcamp.com/album/pop-does-not-mean-popular-a-polite-introduction-to-hussalonia-2004-2014

This offer ends August 1st. Isn’t it time you introduced a friend to Hussalonia? 

http://hussalonia.bandcamp.com/album/pop-does-not-mean-popular-a-polite-introduction-to-hussalonia-2004-2014

Pop Does Not Mean Popular: Special Limited Offer!

Buy this album on Bandcamp before August 1st and you will automatically receive a personalized thank you song! We’ll use the name on your PayPal account, so if you want a different name used, add a note during check-out. Song will be delivered in 48 hours or less! Tell a friend! Help spread the word of Hussalonia!

Episode Four of “Live from the Subterranean Hussalonia Headquarters” is here. I look like a valet who’s just been fired for drinking on the job.

Pop Does Not Mean Popular: A Polite Introduction to Hussalonia (2004-2014), by Hussalonia

Isn’t it time you politely introduced a friend to Hussalonia?

Hark! Episode three of “Live from the Hussalonia Subterranean Headquarters” hath arriveth! Watch only this video for the next 15 days.

I’m reading John Waters’s Car Sick and find myself wanting to stop every time he mentions a song, or in this case, a photograph. For someone who built a career on being tasteless, Waters has impeccable taste.
This is Diane Arbus’s 1962 photo, “House of Horrors.” He mentions it in the first half of the book. I love this photo because it shows you what you’re not supposed to see, the house of horrors exposed - a sinuous track, a cinderblock warehouse, frozen figures in mock terror. What we experience is maybe less fun than a ride in the house of horrors, but no less horrifying, no less mysterious, no less beguiling. By seeing the tracks, the floor, the ceiling, we are forced to think about fellow human beings designing this ride, a ride that forces us to face our fear of mortality, fear of uncertainty. We think about the workers, no doubt dead by now, who built the ride, going home to their families, doing whatever it is people are supposed to be doing while their alive.
This is what we hunter-gatherers do when our basic needs are met. We reconstruct our fears, ride around in the dark, call it fun. How wonderfully strange and horrifying is that?

I’m reading John Waters’s Car Sick and find myself wanting to stop every time he mentions a song, or in this case, a photograph. For someone who built a career on being tasteless, Waters has impeccable taste.

This is Diane Arbus’s 1962 photo, “House of Horrors.” He mentions it in the first half of the book. I love this photo because it shows you what you’re not supposed to see, the house of horrors exposed - a sinuous track, a cinderblock warehouse, frozen figures in mock terror. What we experience is maybe less fun than a ride in the house of horrors, but no less horrifying, no less mysterious, no less beguiling. By seeing the tracks, the floor, the ceiling, we are forced to think about fellow human beings designing this ride, a ride that forces us to face our fear of mortality, fear of uncertainty. We think about the workers, no doubt dead by now, who built the ride, going home to their families, doing whatever it is people are supposed to be doing while their alive.

This is what we hunter-gatherers do when our basic needs are met. We reconstruct our fears, ride around in the dark, call it fun. How wonderfully strange and horrifying is that?

Episode two of “Live from the Subterranean Hussalonia Headquarters” features the song “Never Be Famous.” (Most people first heard this one in episode 31 of Welcome to Night Vale.) 

Hussalonia is proud to unveil the first installment of our modest web show: Live from the Subterranean Hussalonia Headquarters. Stay tuned for a new episode every 1st and 15th of the month, all summer long (seven episodes total). 

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You want to know how to paint a perfect painting? It’s easy. Make yourself perfect and then just paint naturally.
Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance